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Anthrax Assault attorneys replicate on upcoming 20th anniversary

The two attorneys Richard Schular and Jason Weisser, who represented the widow of the country’s first anthrax victim, said when they heard about the upcoming 20. “The fear was that everyone is at risk,” Weisser said. “It was the most productive bio-terrorist attack we have ever seen.” Fear re-plagued the country just days after 9/11 as anthrax letters were sent to lawmakers and several news outlets, including American Media Inc, the editor of the Boca Raton-based National Enquirer. Robert Stevens, who worked there, was the first victim of an anthrax attack. “A husband and a father were killed unnecessarily and died a horrific death,” Schular said. Schular and Weisser represented Stevens’ widow during the year-long legal battle before reaching a $ 2.5 million settlement with the US government. In 2008, the FBI officially recognized Bruce Ivins, a senior biodefense researcher with the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), as the person responsible for the attacks that ultimately killed five people. Ivins died of suicide in 2008 before he was ever charged. “In the end, this was an act of terrorism by a government employee who worked at USAMRIID and actually helped the FBI investigate before they found out he was the culprit,” Schular said. Weisser said one of the scientists interviewed spoke about USAMRIID’s safety. “He said the security here was worse than it was on July 11th and it was so shocking and disappointing for us. The attorneys also took their case to the Florida Supreme Court in 2008, which ruled that “a laboratory that manufactures, grows, tests or handles highly hazardous materials owes due diligence to the general public to avoid unauthorized interception and disclosure” . of these materials. ”

The two lawyers Richard Schular and Jason Weisser, who represented the widow of the country’s first anthrax victim, said when they talked about the upcoming 20 story.

“The fear was that everyone is at risk,” said Weisser. “It was the most productive bio-terrorist attack we have ever seen.”

Fear re-plagued the country just days after 9/11 as anthrax letters were sent to lawmakers and several news outlets, including American Media Inc, the editor of the Boca Raton-based National Enquirer.

Robert Stevens, who worked there, was the first victim of an anthrax attack

“A husband and a father were killed unnecessarily and died a horrific death,” Schular said.

Schular and Weisser represented Stevens’ widow during the year-long legal battle before reaching a $ 2.5 million settlement with the US government.

In 2008, the FBI officially recognized Bruce Ivins, a senior bio-defense researcher with the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), as responsible for the attacks that ultimately killed five people.

Ivins died of suicide in 2008 before he was ever charged.

“In the end, this was an act of terrorism by a government employee who worked at USAMRIID and actually helped the FBI investigate before they found out he was the culprit,” Schular said.

Weisser said one of the scientists interviewed spoke about USAMRIID’s safety.

“He said the security here was worse than it was on July 11th and it was so shocking and disappointing for us.

The attorneys also took their case to the Florida Supreme Court in 2008, which ruled that “a laboratory that manufactures, grows, tests or handles highly hazardous materials owes due diligence to the general public to avoid unauthorized interception and disclosure” . of these materials. ”

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